The Limits of Conscience and the Authority of the Word of God

Last week Rev. Jane Adams Spahr was found not-guilty of ministerial misconduct, even after the openly lesbian Presbyterian minister had defied the teachings of her church by performing “marriages” for two lesbian couples. Given the current state of mainline Protestantism, the actions by the trial court were not completely unexpected. Nevertheless, this act of rebellion against the church’s law and the clear teachings of Scripture sets the stage for an even larger conflict when the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) holds its General Assembly in June.

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Why Thanksgiving Matters

The holiday police are at it again–looking for violations of the nation’s new policy of separating faith and civic celebrations. The same folks who will soon be trolling courthouse squares looking for manger scenes are now calling on Americans to have a happy Thanksgiving . . . but leave God out of it.

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Revisiting the All Saints Case

The New York Times editorializes on the Internal Revenue Service’s investigation of All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California, concluding that “it would seem to…

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A Growing Cloud of Confusion–The Supreme Court on Religion

Over the past half century, the U. S. Supreme Court has accomplished a feat America’s founders would surely have found to be inconceivable–they have created a perverse cloud of confusion over the question of religious liberty and the place of religious language and symbols in the public square.

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Division at Dartmouth—A Christian Speaks His Mind

Dartmouth College is older than the United States of America, having been established in 1750 as “Moore’s Indian Charity School.” The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock, a leading figure in the nation’s first Great Awakening, established the school with the original purpose of evangelizing American Indians. Keep that in mind as you learn of more recent developments.

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Is the Pledge of Allegiance Unconstitutional?

A federal judge in Sacramento ruled Wednesday that it is unconstitutional to recite the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton ruled that the pledge’s reference to one nation “under God” violates the right of children in the public schools to be “free from a coercive requirement to affirm God.” Once again, the driving force behind this case is Michael Newdow–the atheist attorney and medical doctor who won a similar decision at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2002.

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Two Competing Religions–The Legacy of the 1960s

Today’s culture wars can be directly traced to the cultural transformations of the 1960’s. As a matter of fact, that critical decade represented nothing less than a cultural revolution of sorts–a revolution Stanley Kurtz describes as “both a fulfillment and a repudiation of the vision of America’s founders.”

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The Ten Commandments Decisions

Today’s commentary, Two Decisions, Two Worldviews–The Ten Commandments Decisions, considers the meaning and impact of the two decisions handed down yesterday. The decisions aside, this…

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Two Decisions, Two Worldviews–The Ten Commandments Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court handed down its long-expected decisions on the public display of the Ten Commandments on Monday, producing more confusion than clarification in the process. Before the day was out, the nation’s High Court had handed down two decisions, represented by eight separate opinions from nine justices. At the end of the day, the real winners were the lawyers, who can look forward to a tidal wave of litigation in the aftermath of these confusing decisions.

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What’s the Battle Over Gay Marriage Really About?

The June 19, 2005 cover story of The New York Times Magazine is entitled, “What’s the Movement to Outlaw Gay Marriage Really About?” The article deserves significant attention. Interest is likely to be sparked by a line printed on the cover just under the article’s title. That line suggests that the battle to outlaw gay marriage is “not just about marriage.” Of course, that statement is profoundly true–and that’s what makes the article interesting.

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Needed: An Exit Strategy

As the Southern Baptist Convention convenes in Nashville next week, the issue of public education is once again at the center of potential controversy. For the second year in a row, proposed resolutions have been submitted to the denomination’s Committee on Resolutions, calling for Christians to reconsider support for the nation’s public school system.

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